Marketing for Hulu

Posted on 13. Mar, 2011 by .

0

Hulu is a new product that allows TV audiences to watch shows on demand over the internet.  The potential market is the total number of broadband subscribers in the U.S.  Some factors that impact Hulu’s marketing are:

  • How many U.S. households don’t own a TV?  (these potential customers are mostly likely to use Hulu)
  • How many U.S. households own a DVR, either Tivo or digital cable box?  (these devices might be more convenient than Hulu)
  • How can Hulu market this new product to all potential customers?  (they ran a superbowll ad)
  • How can Hulu get existing customers to recommend shows to their friends?
  • Where do potential customers look for TV shows?  (Hulu uploaded teaser videos on YouTube)
  • How can Hulu change consumer behavior to habitually watch TV over the Internet?  (its parent company fear cannibalizing TV audience and revenue)
  • If Hulu decided to lock up parts of its library behind a paywall, how will it effect its market share?  What are the tradeoffs between lost market share and incremental revenue potential?
  • With the availability mobile broadband available on smart phones and tablets, can Hulu provide an on-the-go product?  How much should they charge for it?

Continue Reading

Response to Zinio case

Posted on 06. Mar, 2011 by .

0

Zinio feel more like a vitamin than a painkiller.  Consumers are happy reading print magazines.  Zinio bet that if they copy and paste the entire magazine to a PDF file, users will want to purchase the digital version.  But consumers couldn’t care less.  Thus, no matter how they try to market or distribute Zinio, the product is not going to sell because it is not superior to print–at least according to consumer perception.

All the market and product analysis the Zinio team did was based secondary research.  (The case mentioned that IDEO designed it, but I doubt that IDEO’s product concepts were taken seriously; because IDEO would definitely have questioned the basic assumption of copying and pasting the content in its entirety.)

I would have recommended that they actually go out and observe early adopters who were consuming news and entertainment on digital devices.  Then they should build prototypes and give them to users.  If the users say that they cannot live without this new tool (based on primary research such as diary studies), then Zinio is a product with potential for mass adoption.  Until then, all the business goals and projections are pie in the sky, and Zinio should spend resources to iterate on the prototypes until they figure out what consumers need.

Continue Reading

NY Times: Queens of the Mom-Blog Kingdom

Posted on 24. Feb, 2011 by .

1

NY Times Magazine article about how mommy blogs make money:

Typically, there are 100,000 visitors daily to her site, Dooce.com, where she writes about her kids, her husband, her pets, her treatment for depression and her life as a liberal ex-Mormon living in Utah. As she points out, a sizable number also follow her on Twitter (in the year and a half since she threatened Maytag, she has added a half-million more). She is the only blogger on the latest Forbes list of the Most Influential Women in Media, coming in at No. 26, which is 25 slots behind Oprah, but just one slot behind Tina Brown. Her site brings in an estimated $30,000 to $50,000 a month or more — and that’s not even counting the revenue from her two books, healthy speaking fees and the contracts she signed to promote Verizon and appear on HGTV.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/27/magazine/27armstrong-t.html

Continue Reading

How will service providers pay for listing?

Posted on 23. Feb, 2011 by .

1

I was looking through Craigslist’s childcare services section and thought of a big problem with my business plan: how am I going to collect payment from services providers.  Most service providers won’t use a credit to pay to post an online ad.  They tend to deal in cash offline, whether it’s the babysitter or the kids clothing store.  How can my site track whether a transaction resulted from the parent and the service provider finding one another on my site?  Even if the tracking works, will these service providers be willing to pay with their credit cards online?

Continue Reading

About Silly Parents

Posted on 22. Feb, 2011 by .

0

Please describe your business
Sillyparents.com is an online and mobile community for parents to get involved in news, events and resources at the hyperlocal level.  This social media platform will provide them with tools to interact with each other and engage with local community issues, events and advocacy in the interest of their children.

Identify the actual “product” of the business
The product could be a website, mailing lists, Facebook groups, mobile app, or any combination of the these.  It will also have a paid listing service for local service providers who want to advertise to parents.

Whether it will be high traffic or low traffic (or even medium traffic)
Low traffic

Whether it will need to be housed in a large space or a small space
small space

regional: will they be local, national, or global?
local

generational: are the young or old?
parents with young children

medium: are they on the go or stationary (mobile, desktop, etc.)
both mobile and stationary

industry: The Any Man, journalists, etc…
Parents and service providers such as nannies, baby sitters, piano instructors, etc…

Continue Reading

3 market research questions

Posted on 21. Feb, 2011 by .

0
  1. Where are the family friendly neighborhoods in NYC?  Do they correspond to good school districts?  What are other factors that make a neighbor good for raising kids?
  2. How much money do parents parents on children at age 1, 2, 3?
  3. What kinds of privacy concerns would parents have regarding participating in online communities?

Continue Reading

What will my project disrupt

Posted on 21. Feb, 2011 by .

0

Silly Parents will disrupt the market for products, services, and issues that impact families with young children.

Continue Reading

Response to Innovation

Posted on 21. Feb, 2011 by .

0

When I doing my graduate studies at Berkeley, there was a lot of talk about how to commercialize all the amazing scientific breakthroughs that was occurring the engineering school.  It was difficult for school administrators, business school students, and even venture capitalists to come up with a process for turning an invention into a massively profitable business.  My takeaway was that the skills to invent something is very different from the skill to run a company.  That’s why a startup needs 2 co-founders: 1 technical and 1 business.

The 1 thing that makes Silicon Valley special is that failure is an option–in fact, it’s a respectable outcome.  I’ve heard many people say: “if you’re going to fail, fail fast.”  The staff of every failed company learns from their mistakes and does better at the next place they work.  And that is how Silicon Valley attracts the best talents from around the world: because it’s a meritocracy for resilient hackers and dreamers.

Continue Reading

Got a domain

Posted on 20. Feb, 2011 by .

0

www.sillyparents.com

just brought the domain.

Continue Reading

Politico case study response

Posted on 16. Feb, 2011 by .

0

It was interesting that Politico started as both a print and a website.  Whereas the site reached a bigger national audience, the print publication reach a niche audience of Washington insiders.  But it is by selling ads in the print newspaper that Politico is able to generate sufficient revenue to pay for most of its expenses.

I noticed a few differences between Silicon Valley startups and Politico.  Silicon Valley venture capitalists look for a $1 billion market opportunity and are willing to loss tens or even hundreds of millions of dollars in the first few years as the startup builds its product and capture market share.  In return, investors hope the company will scale up quickly to be able to generate a lot of revenue in the future, so that the company’s valuation grows at least tenfold.  By contrast Politico’s founders and investor, Allbritton Communications, wanted to reach profitability as soon as possible.  The reason for this difference may be that Politico is in a market that does not scale up to a billion dollars, and the marginal cost is higher than a for a technology product.

In terms of its revenue strategy, Politico sold ads in its site and paper publication.  The case study briefly mentions the Political Media Group, which is both a content syndication and an ad network for political content.  I am curios about well how that product has performed in augmenting revenue.

According to Wikipedia, the print publication is contributing the majority of its revenue:

As of July [2009] it was expected to have annual revenue of around $15 million, primarily from the printed product…

I wonder how Politico can increase its online revenue.  A few things I found and thought about are:

  • Politico Pro – a subscription only premium content product
  • Politico Jobs board – fee for posting a job
  • Charging higher rates for ads by profiling its online audience and targeting ads to them

Continue Reading